Obama Takes Axe to Keystone XL Permit

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TransCanada Corp. announced it will review all of its options in light of a permit denial for Keystone XL. Those options include filing a new application to receive a Presidential Permit for a cross border crude oil pipeline from Canada to the U.S.
  “TransCanada and its shippers remain absolutely committed to building this important energy infrastructure project,” said Russ Girling, TransCanada’s president and chief executive officer. “We will review our options to potentially file a new application for border-crossing authority to ship our customer’s crude oil, and will now analyze the stated rationale for the denial.”
  Girling points out that TransCanada continues to have the support of American and Canadian workers, labor organizations, industry and most of all, the American and Canadian people. He adds with their continued support, the company believes that a pipeline will eventually be built as this is the safest, most economically efficient means of getting crude oil to market.
  On November 6th, The White House released President Obama’s statement on the long-awaited decision. He said, “Several years ago, the State Department began a review process for the proposed construction of a pipeline that would carry Canadian crude oil through our heartland to ports in the Gulf of Mexico and out into the world market. This morning, Secretary Kerry informed me that, after extensive public outreach and consultation with other Cabinet agencies, the State Department has decided that the Keystone XL Pipeline would not serve the national interest of the United States. I agree with that decision.”
  He also declared, “Now, for years, the Keystone Pipeline has occupied what I, frankly, consider an overinflated role in our political discourse.  It became a symbol too often used as a campaign cudgel by both parties rather than a serious policy matter.  And all of this obscured the fact that this pipeline would neither be a silver bullet for the economy, as was promised by some, nor the express lane to climate disaster proclaimed by others.”
  Obama followed these statements with the three main reasons that the project was denied by the State Department. First, he claimed that the pipeline would not bring in the amount of jobs that were hoped for and therefore wouldn’t be a long-term contributor to the U.S. economy. Second, he said that the “pipeline would not lower gas prices for American consumers.” Third, he stated that as America tries to move towards cleaner energy, transporting tar sands through the country will only increase U.S. dependence on “dirty” fossil fuels.
  He closed his speech by stating, “As long as I’m President of the United States, America is going to hold ourselves to the same high standards to which we hold the rest of the world.  And three weeks from now, I look forward to joining my fellow world leaders in Paris, where we’ve got to come together around an ambitious framework to protect the one planet that we’ve got while we still can. If we want to prevent the worst effects of climate change before it’s too late, the time to act is now. Not later. Not someday. Right here, right now. And I’m optimistic about what we can accomplish together. I’m optimistic because our own country proves, every day — one step at a time — that not only do we have the power to combat this threat, we can do it while creating new jobs, while growing our economy, while saving money, while helping consumers, and most of all, leaving our kids a cleaner, safer planet at the same time. That’s what our own ingenuity and action can do. That’s what we can accomplish. And America is prepared to show the rest of the world the way forward.”